Nov
10
2009
0

ATI 4870 + Fedora 10 + 9.10 Catalyst drivers = World of Warcraft on Linux!!!!

Just an update to my previous article, ripping ATI for their lame Linux support – I finally got World of Warcraft working on Fedora 10, ATI 4870 graphics card, Catalyst 9.10 drivers!  All it took was down grading from Fedora 11 to Fedora 10, turning off my open GL desktop and waiting 6 months for four driver releases from ATI.  That’s all it took to run a game that works great on Linux… if you bought an NVIDIA card!

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May
24
2009
2

Tweaking Linux and WINE for World of Warcraft

It’s great that the World of Warcraft runs well on recent editions of WINE(Unbuntu/Fedora), but even when using OpenGL the typical Linux user can expect a frame rate reduction from 15%-30% over Windows XP.  However, I must point out that there are many reports of frame rate drops in Windows Vista and Presumably Windows 7(because of virtualization of XP apps).

All this is okay for typical grinding, leveling, and five man instances.  That said,  my GeForce 7950 GTX is only cranking out 30 FPS in low populated zones…  So for the bigger raids, PVP, and highly populated zones like Dalaran it can be frustrating trying to pwn at 12-16 FPS.  In fact my mission is to get at least 40 fps with the graphics card I have.

I was able to improve my frame rate by disabling mods like ‘Questhelper’ in battle grounds.  I added additional RAM to my system.  Although the frame rate boost was negligible; loading times were cut in half. (more…)

May
07
2009
0

How to make USB and DVD ROM drives work on Fedora 10

Lately, I’ve been working on Asterisk PBX related articles, but today we’re going to tackle a common problem with Fedora 10: getting drives to mount to the Desktop.  If you are experiencing trouble, the likely cause is that your current user, does not have permissions to access that hardware.  The reason for this has a lot to do with the security model of Linux.

In the old days computers came on large mainframes.  It was not practical for engineers and scientist to have their very own main frame, so Unix was designed to be a multi-user operating system.  Everyone connected their own keyboard & monitor.  The permission structure was set so only certain individual accounts could do certain things.  Like say, reboot a system or delete a database.

By contrast Microsoft Windows(thru XP) is a single user operating system.  In Windows you can create extra accounts, but any of those accounts can execute arbitrary code from anywhere in the file system (c:\\ drive).  Which is a big reason for the many attacks on Windows systems.

Recently my friend got a virus that made XP unbootable and stole his World of Warcraft account login and password.  The hacker then used that information to login to his account, change his password, and his accounts valid email address.  The hacker then sold all his gear and used his character to scam other people in bad trades.  The account became banned for “economic extortion” before my friend could get his Windows XP machine back up and running.  Now he runs WoW on WINE/Fedora 10.

An appeal to Blizzard got his account back after several days and many emails. My friend requested that they check the IP address of the hacker and compare that to his previous logins.  What if the virus had collected his bank account credentials instead?  In a way he got lucky.

Goals of this Post:

– correct authorizations in Fedora 10 and allow access to USB and DVD – ROM devices

It seems odd that someone would be unable to access a USB thumb drive on any modern desktop computer, but Red Hat the maker of Fedora Linux is far more interested in their commercial offering, Red Hat Enterprise Linux(RHEL).  They model RHEL development on previous versions of Fedora.  So desktop integration is obviously not their top priority; stability and security is.  This neglect has allowed rival Unbuntu Linux to come in and snatch up the Linux desktop market.  Big mistake Red Hat…  however with a little work we can make Fedora 10 desktop work well without them.

So to correct the permissions issue(from Gnome) start by clicking, System –> Preferences –> System –> Authorizations.  Fedora may ask you for your ‘root’ password.

fedora10-authorizations-usb

fedora10-authorizations-usb

Set access to allow anyone to mount and unmount USB and other devices!  I hope this helps.  It’s frustrating dealing with these little things, but hey, “it’s free”!  If it doesn’t take, leave a comment below and I’ll try to help.