Sep
09
2009
0

Adjust date & time (NTP) on Fedora Linux

Correct time is crucial for many Network services.  Time stamps are required for accurate logs, email, and in the case of Asterisk – voicemail.  A customer sent me a request for instructions on adjusting date & time for their Asterisk PBX.  Most Fedora based systems come with a tool just for this purpose.  From the Desktop open a console window and type:

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Jun
28
2009
1

Polycom 501 XML configuration file Example

This file is named by the MAC address of your Polycom SoundPoint IP SIP phone followed by, ‘-phone.cfg’.  In your FTP folder you would have a file for each phone – I have a single phone.  It’s MAC is ‘0004F202734B’; so my phones configuration file would be named, ‘0004f202734b-phone.cfg’.  I believe there are other conventions for naming this file as well.

The example below was used to connect my phone with a VoiceIP Solutions Asterisk PBX.  This example shows just a fraction of the many possible features in this line.  For my purposes, I defined the Asterisk server IP address, and it’s SIP credentials.  I also added the NTP server.  The ‘mwi’ tag refers to ‘message waiting information’, here I set the mailbox(s) I’m subscribing to and the extension to check voicemail.   My Asterisk voicemail menu is extension ‘299’.

0004f202734b-phone.cfg:

<?xml version=”1.0″ encoding=”UTF-8″ standalone=”yes”?>
<!– Example Per-phone Configuration File –>
<!– $RCSfile: phone1.cfg,v $  $Revision: 1.104.2.2 $ –>
<phone1>
<reg
reg.1.displayName=”5555″
reg.1.address=”5555″
reg.1.auth.userId=”5555″
reg.1.auth.password=”2005″
reg.1.server.1.address=”192.168.1.254″
tcpIpApp.sntp.address=”pool.ntp.org”
tcpIpApp.sntp.gmtOffset=”-33600″
>
<mwi
msg.mwi.1.subscribe=”5555″
msg.mwi.1.callBackMode=”contact”
msg.mwi.1.callBack=”299″
>
</phone1>

Apr
22
2009
1

extensions.conf – agent logoff example

[general]

static=yes
writeprotect=no

[bogon-calls]

exten => _x.,1,Congestion

[macro-stdexten]
;
;for dialing internal extensions

exten => s,1,Set(dynext=${DB(dynext/${ARG1})})
exten => s,n,NoOp(${dynext})
exten => s,n,NoOp(${LEN(${dynext})})
exten => s,n,GotoIf($[“${LEN(${dynext})}” = “7”]?s,100)
exten => s,n,GotoIf($[“${LEN(${dynext})}” = “10”]?s,100)
exten => s,n,GotoIf($[“${LEN(${dynext})}” = “11”]?s,100)
exten => s,n,GotoIf($[“${LEN(${dynext})}” = “6”]?s,200) ; Calls 6-digit Extension
exten => s,n,GotoIf($[“${LEN(${dynext})}” = “0”]?s,300) ; Calls 6-digit Extension
exten => s,n(dial),Dial(SIP/${dynext},20,twW) ; Ring the interface, 20 seconds maximum
exten => s,n,Goto(s-${DIALSTATUS},1) ; Jump based on status
exten => s,100,Dial(ZAP/g1/${dynext},20,twW) ; Ring the interface, 20 seconds maximum
exten => s,101,Goto(s-${DIALSTATUS},1) ; Jump based on status
exten => s,200,Goto(from-sip,${dynext},1); Calls 6-digit Extension
exten => s,300,Set(dynext=${ARG1})
exten => s,301,Goto(dial)

exten => s-BUSY,1,Voicemail(b${ARG1}) ; If busy, send to voicemail w/ busy announce
exten => s-BUSY,2,Hangup
exten => s-NOANSWER,1,Voicemail(u${ARG1}) ; If unavailable, send to voicemail
exten => s-NOANSWER,2,Hangup
exten => _s-.,1,Goto(s-NOANSWER,1) ; Treat anything else as no answer

[from-sip]

include => test
include => from-internal

[test]

exten => 1234,1,agi(matts-test.agi)
exten => 1234,2,wait(2)
;exten => 1234,n,voicemail(8888)
exten => 1234,n,hangup

[from-internal]

;Standard Internal Extensions

exten => _888X,1,Macro(stdexten,${EXTEN},sip/${EXTEN})
exten => _888X,2,Hangup

;Logon
exten => 1000,1,AgentcallbackLogin(${CALLERID(num)}||${CALLERID(num)}@savelono-queue-out)
exten => 1000,n,hangup

;Logoff – best alternative I’ve found so far
;could be better with additional logic

exten => 1001,1,System(/usr/sbin/asterisk -rx “agent logoff Agent/${CALLERID(NUM)}”)
exten => 1001,n,RemoveQueueMember(savelono-support|Agent/${CALLERID(NUM)})
exten => 1001,n,Playback(agent-loggedoff)
exten => 1001,n,Playback(auth-thankyou)
exten => 1001,n,Hangup

;Logoff this way works but is not very intuitive because you
;have to hit the # key when prompted for a dial back extension
;it really doesn’t make sense to endusers
;
exten => 1002,1,AgentcallbackLogin(${CALLERID(num)}||)
exten => 1002,n,hangup

[savelono-queue-out]

include => from-internal

Mar
19
2009
4

VoiceIP Solutions offers Asterisk PHP GUI for large scale deployments



VoiceIP Solutions
is a Asterisk ‘consulting & deployment’ company in Seattle Washington.  They deploy Asterisk solutions for businesses of all sizes.  From small offices to universities and call centers.  They have sites deployed all over the United States, but mostly on the West Coast.  I’ve been following them for some time; I guess they started deploying Asterisk before 1.2 was released.  I talked to one of their sales rep’s(I think his name was Liam) about the business and wondered if they had done any development work?  He told me that they had done some PHP work for managing larger installs and proceeded to direct me to one of there engineer/developers.

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Oct
15
2008
0

Simple Bash script that copy’s a directory of files and renames them with a Time Stamp

NOTE: I myself am a novice with BASH. I hate scripting, but hey, it’s necessary part of most sysadmin jobs. I came across several hurdles (like changing a name and adding a time stamp in the same loop). I hope this document helps. Please click on my adds, they help pay for the hosting. Thanks and enjoy.

-Matt

—————————————————————–

In this scenario I have a customer that I did a custom Asterisk(Open Source PBX) installation for.  They want the capability to backup all voicemails for management to review.  So naturally I made a cron job that copied Asterisk voicemails to a web directory that was htaccess protected.   It seemed to work except I forgot that asterisk copies messages in the format ‘msg001.wav’.

The problem is that if a user erases the messages in his/her mailbox, then the next new incoming voicemail is named ‘msg001’ again. Next, the voicemail gets copied to the web directory and overwrites the original ‘msg001’.  So my challenge is to create a cron job, that copies the new messages and then renames them on the fly with a new name and an appended time stamp.

Every minute the script copies Asterisk voicemail accounts to another arbitrary directory.   Two loops are run on the contents of that directory matching the pattern ‘5???/mess*'(or in Asterisk syntax 5XXX/mess.).  In the case of my customer their VM boxes are all 5XXX(5001,5002,etc..).  The first loops adds a time stamp from when the voicemail was originally created.  The second loop strips ‘message??’ and replaces it with ‘voicemail_’. The result being something like: ‘voicemail_2008-09-15-03:14:09.wav’. I have to change the messages part because if I dont the first loop will add a second time stamp to previously stamped files.

At the end of the script we want to delete the message00?.txt file, because it is not relevent to simply downloading voicemail and may confuse some users. Also we have to change the owner/group to apache so the web server has permission to host the files.

The voicemail are protected with ‘.htaccess’ file, but with some additional work we could make user access based on PAM, LDAP, or MySQL.

Avaya sells voicemail auditing servers for $40,000 per server. But with the Open Source Asterisk PBX and a simple BASH script we can create a comparable system for under $1,000. However this script can be re-purposed for copying and renaming files for any task. Take care.

-Matt

script:

#!/bin/bash



#set -x



# Variable containing array
#==========================================================================



DIRECTORY1=”/var/spool/asterisk/voicemail/default/????”
DIRECTORY2=”/var/www/html/voicemail/”
AUDIT=”/var/www/html/voicemail/????/INBOX/msg*.wav”
MSGFILES=”/var/www/html/voicemail/????/INBOX/msg????.txt”



# copy files to web directory
cp -ruvp $DIRECTORY1 $DIRECTORY2



#rename those files with a time stamp
for i in $AUDIT ;



do mv $i $i$(date -r $i +%F-%T).wav ;



done



#——————————————————



#strip the ‘messages’ part of the name and replace w/ ‘voicemail’
for i in $AUDIT ;



do mv “$i” “${i/msg????.wav/voicemail_}” ;



done



# remove any msg????.txt files



rm -rf $MSGFILES



chown -R apache $DIRECTORY2
chgrp -R apache $DIRECTORY2

With Apache, Asterisk and this simple BASH script we have just created a web accessible way to check and back up voicemail!